Posts Tagged ‘n.w.a.’

Take It Personal – West Coast Classics

Thursday, August 31st, 2017

Episode 14 is the first installment of our West Coast Classics. Dust off those Chucks, throw on your khakis and strap-in for this for this west side roller-coaster ride. We got tunes from N.W.A., Ice T, Too $hort, King Tee, DJ Quik, Digital Underground, Above The Law, 2Pac, Cypress Hill, W.C., Murs, Kurupt, People Under The Stairs, MC Eiht, Nate Dogg, The Game, Ras Kass, The B.U.M.S., plus special tributes to Snoop Dogg & Dr. Dre, Hieroglyphics and The Likwit Crew. Keep it locked, cuz the TIP crew is just getting started on this WCC series and even though there is a lot to cover, we tackle this muthf*cker like Lyle Azado.

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What’s fucking with Death Certificate?

Monday, June 14th, 2010


Not much! That is the right answer. I was listening to this over the weekend and realized there isn’t much messing with Death Certificate since its release. Maybe Illmatic is the exception for solo albums but overall this album was (is) flawless. Don’t even come with that Ready To Die shit either, the b-side to Death Certificate shits on R.T.D.

Peep this thread and let your opinion pop! –Philaflava

Whatever Happened To N.W.A’s Posse?

Monday, May 10th, 2010
A very interesting and great read, written by Martin Cizmar, featured on L.A. Weekly, published on May 6, 2010.
Martin Cizmar is the music editor at Phoenix New Times.
Thanks to philaflava forum member Dan for revealing us this amazing article.
** Read the full article by clicking on here.
Whatever Happened To N.W.A’s Posse?
The cover of the 1987 album N.W.A and the Posse does not look like something released by one of the most important rap groups of all time. Actually, just looking at the photo, who would believe that some of the guys in this alleyway would change the course of popular music forever less than a year after the flashbulb popped? Who would guess these men were capable of creating their own genre of music, putting their fingerprints on nearly every hip-hop song written in the past 20 years? In fact, this picture is a perfect snapshot of one of the most important scenes in the history of popular music. Stare for a moment and you can see a myth about to be born. That myth, gangsta rap, enabled four guys in this picture — Dr. Dre, Ice Cube, MC Ren and Eazy-E — to titillate and terrify America as Compton-based rap group Niggaz With Attitude. The mythical power of N.W.A certainly doesn’t come from the clock necklaces, the running pants or the Jheri curls. Look to the left, at the bottles of malt liquor, the plain jeans and the black ball caps. Those props (and that’s the right word) hint at what’s going on here, which is the gestation of gangsta rap.

Anyone who knows anything about rap can pick out at least two guys in this photo: Dr. Dre and Ice Cube. If you’re into the old school, you can probably identify four of the dozen, adding MC Ren and Eazy-E. A true N.W.A fan could pick out Arabian Prince, who is standing next to Cube.
Pretty much no one not in the photo — not even the most hard-core hip-hop heads — can ID the rest of the posse pictured, other than maybe giving a 20-year-old street name. Until now, that is.
It took a lot of work, but we’ve tracked down all 12 guys from the Posse record cover. Some of these guys are on Hollywood’s A-list, others drive trucks, but they were all once part of the same posse.
**Read the full article by clicking on here.
Thank you Martin Cizmar for this great retrospective.
–Markshot

Blood of Abraham – Future Profits (1993)

Saturday, April 17th, 2010

Obscure? Yes. Dollar bin purchase? More than likely. Worthy of listening? Most fucking definitely. Maybe it’s me but I was always kinda a sucker for any release that Ruthless put out. Who would have ever expected Eazy-E to rip a track with Will.i.am? Future Profits has its hits such as Life, Southern Comfort, Devil Gets No Daps, Niggaz & Jews and my personal favorite Stabbed By The Steeple. Don’t sleep on this. Yeah they weren’t the best Jewish rappers we’ve heard of, but B.O.A. were pretty dope in their own right. The producer Epic later went to form Crazy Town and crafted their one-hit wonder “Butterfly.” He is the herb in the D.A.R.E. t-shirt (peep the link). If anyone has the “Life (Remix)” please hit me up. –Philaflava

01 Future Profits (Intro)
02 This Great Land Devours (Feat. Junior P.)
03 Southern Comfort (Feat. Willonex)
04 Stick To Your Own Kind (Feat. Yomo)
05 That Ol’ Dupree Shit
06 I’m Not The Man
07 Father Of Many Nations
08 Devils Get No Dap (Feat. Rafiki Cai)
09 3-2-1 Contact
10 Stabbed By The Steeple
11 Another Nail In The Coffin
12 Life
13 Niggaz and Jewz (Some Say Kikes) (Feat. Eazy-E and Willonex)
14 Loose Interpretation Of The End (Outro)

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Blood of Abraham was an American hip-hop duo composed of Benyad (Benjamin Mor) and Mazik (David Saevitz). They debuted in 1993 with the release of the LP Future Profits on Ruthless Records, the label of the late Eric “Eazy-E” Wright.

A key characteristic of the group was the novelty of their unapologetic Jewish identity. Their best-known track is “Niggaz and Jewz (Some Say Kikes)”, an irreverent call for Black-Jewish unity in the face of shared struggle against bigotry. Made at the height of the strain on Black-Jewish relations in the United States. its opening sample was an actual recording[citation needed] of the ravings of a Ku Klux Klansman, and it featured a spirited verse from Eazy-E as well as the first recorded appearance by will.i.am of the Black Eyed Peas known then as Will 1X (the group was then known as “Atban Klann”.) Other tracks dealing with Jewish themes were “Father of Many Nations” (a song in praise of the Biblical patriarch Abraham) and “Stick To Your Own Kind”.

A video was shot for the track “Stabbed by the Steeple,” and print ads were centered around large text proclaiming “Jesus was a Black Jew,” but the album did not receive much publicity beyond that. Blood of Abraham fell into anonymity; their status worsened in 1995 with the death of Eazy-E and the subsequent folding of the Ruthless and Relativity Records labels.

Mazik and Benyad then went on hiatus until 2000, which saw the unofficial release of the LP Eyedollartree on Mastergrip Records, which folded shortly thereafter. Eyedollartree featured guest appearances from maverick rappers Kool Keith and Divine Styler, as well as will.i.am. Basement Records oversaw the official release of Eyedollartree (with bonus DVD) in late 2005.

Peace to HQ Hip-Hop for the link.