Posts Tagged ‘eazy-e’

Evolution Of The B-Boy

Friday, November 22nd, 2013

B-Boy_Series_1_Stickers_01

Longtime Philaflava member and T.R.O.Y. blog affiliate Mark 563 drops his debut, Evolution Of The B-Boy series. These are high quality contour-cut stickers featuring the first 4 illustrations from Mark 563. They feature Eazy-E, LL Cool J, Big Daddy Kane & Slick Rick (between 3.5” and 3.8” tall). They’re going to go with the quickness, so make sure you support the homie and grab yourself the first of many in the series.

Cop series 1 for just $10 right here.

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The D.O.C.’s Top 5 Ghostwritten Songs

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

Somebody desperately needs to do a Death Row documentary that isn’t contrived, corny and where QDIII has no involvement. The D.O.C. is a book waiting to happen. –Philaflava

1. “Nuthin’ But A ‘G’ Thang,” Dr. Dre featuring Snoop
“When ”G’ Thang’ was created, I was living in Agoura Hills, and Snoop and Warren G were living with me. In 1990 me and Snoop each took the beat to different parts of the house to write. Snoop went upstairs, I stayed downstairs, and we met back up in an hour. When he came back downstairs I said, ‘Let’s take this piece and put it here…This doesn’t really work there.’ It’s really just like a jigsaw [puzzle]. And then I said, ‘For the last line [of Dre’s verse], let’s put my name on there,’ because otherwise I wouldn’t get to be in the song. That’s why Dre says: Like my nigga D.O.C./ No one can do it better.”

2. “We Want Eazy,” Eazy-E
“That was the first day I ever went to the studio with Dre in Cali, in 1988. Dre pulled up the track and said, ‘Doc, you got something?’ Eazy, Ren and Yella were there — Cube wasn’t around a lot. [The song] took me 15 minutes to write. When you’re 19 and excited, that shit comes out of you like piss. Eazy started learning it — that took a day or two. He wasn’t the most talented motherfucker in the world; it generally took him 12 hours to get through a verse. But when he got it it was good, and pretty soon the song was every-fucking-where. That’s a testament to Dre, who taught me 95 percent of what I know.

3. “The Next Episode,” Dr. Dre, featuring Snoop Dogg, Nate Dogg, and Kurupt
“I’d cultivated that song for such a long time. The very last line of ”G’ Thang’ is ‘Just chill ’till the next episode,’ but this song didn’t happen for ten more years. We did it three or four times before it finally appeared on 2001. We were just waiting for the right story, and 2001 ended up being a huge record.”

4. “Prelude/Still Talkin’,” Eazy-E
“That’s my Rakim impression: ‘Easily I approach…’ That was me giving Eazy East coast impressions that other West coast guys weren’t up on…[At that point] everyone was saying I was the greatest. I got a big head. When I came in with a good rap, Cube would have to go home and re-write his raps. We would goof around. Once we pretended we were film critics from London. It was funny to see Cube with his gheri curl, doing a British accent.

5. “Alwayz Into Somethin’,” NWA
“This was when Cube had just left the group. I’d just lost my voice. Everyone’s wondering, ‘How’s NWA gonna continue, with Cube gone?’ As for me, all I had was alcohol and strip clubs. I was going though a tough time. I wrote that song for everyone, and it made me feel that even though I’d lost my voice I was still valuable

Source: LA Weekly

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Whatever Happened To N.W.A’s Posse?

Monday, May 10th, 2010
A very interesting and great read, written by Martin Cizmar, featured on L.A. Weekly, published on May 6, 2010.
Martin Cizmar is the music editor at Phoenix New Times.
Thanks to philaflava forum member Dan for revealing us this amazing article.
** Read the full article by clicking on here.
Whatever Happened To N.W.A’s Posse?
The cover of the 1987 album N.W.A and the Posse does not look like something released by one of the most important rap groups of all time. Actually, just looking at the photo, who would believe that some of the guys in this alleyway would change the course of popular music forever less than a year after the flashbulb popped? Who would guess these men were capable of creating their own genre of music, putting their fingerprints on nearly every hip-hop song written in the past 20 years? In fact, this picture is a perfect snapshot of one of the most important scenes in the history of popular music. Stare for a moment and you can see a myth about to be born. That myth, gangsta rap, enabled four guys in this picture — Dr. Dre, Ice Cube, MC Ren and Eazy-E — to titillate and terrify America as Compton-based rap group Niggaz With Attitude. The mythical power of N.W.A certainly doesn’t come from the clock necklaces, the running pants or the Jheri curls. Look to the left, at the bottles of malt liquor, the plain jeans and the black ball caps. Those props (and that’s the right word) hint at what’s going on here, which is the gestation of gangsta rap.

Anyone who knows anything about rap can pick out at least two guys in this photo: Dr. Dre and Ice Cube. If you’re into the old school, you can probably identify four of the dozen, adding MC Ren and Eazy-E. A true N.W.A fan could pick out Arabian Prince, who is standing next to Cube.
Pretty much no one not in the photo — not even the most hard-core hip-hop heads — can ID the rest of the posse pictured, other than maybe giving a 20-year-old street name. Until now, that is.
It took a lot of work, but we’ve tracked down all 12 guys from the Posse record cover. Some of these guys are on Hollywood’s A-list, others drive trucks, but they were all once part of the same posse.
**Read the full article by clicking on here.
Thank you Martin Cizmar for this great retrospective.
–Markshot

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Blood of Abraham – Future Profits (1993)

Saturday, April 17th, 2010

Obscure? Yes. Dollar bin purchase? More than likely. Worthy of listening? Most fucking definitely. Maybe it’s me but I was always kinda a sucker for any release that Ruthless put out. Who would have ever expected Eazy-E to rip a track with Will.i.am? Future Profits has its hits such as Life, Southern Comfort, Devil Gets No Daps, Niggaz & Jews and my personal favorite Stabbed By The Steeple. Don’t sleep on this. Yeah they weren’t the best Jewish rappers we’ve heard of, but B.O.A. were pretty dope in their own right. The producer Epic later went to form Crazy Town and crafted their one-hit wonder “Butterfly.” He is the herb in the D.A.R.E. t-shirt (peep the link). If anyone has the “Life (Remix)” please hit me up. –Philaflava

01 Future Profits (Intro)
02 This Great Land Devours (Feat. Junior P.)
03 Southern Comfort (Feat. Willonex)
04 Stick To Your Own Kind (Feat. Yomo)
05 That Ol’ Dupree Shit
06 I’m Not The Man
07 Father Of Many Nations
08 Devils Get No Dap (Feat. Rafiki Cai)
09 3-2-1 Contact
10 Stabbed By The Steeple
11 Another Nail In The Coffin
12 Life
13 Niggaz and Jewz (Some Say Kikes) (Feat. Eazy-E and Willonex)
14 Loose Interpretation Of The End (Outro)

Download

Blood of Abraham was an American hip-hop duo composed of Benyad (Benjamin Mor) and Mazik (David Saevitz). They debuted in 1993 with the release of the LP Future Profits on Ruthless Records, the label of the late Eric “Eazy-E” Wright.

A key characteristic of the group was the novelty of their unapologetic Jewish identity. Their best-known track is “Niggaz and Jewz (Some Say Kikes)”, an irreverent call for Black-Jewish unity in the face of shared struggle against bigotry. Made at the height of the strain on Black-Jewish relations in the United States. its opening sample was an actual recording[citation needed] of the ravings of a Ku Klux Klansman, and it featured a spirited verse from Eazy-E as well as the first recorded appearance by will.i.am of the Black Eyed Peas known then as Will 1X (the group was then known as “Atban Klann”.) Other tracks dealing with Jewish themes were “Father of Many Nations” (a song in praise of the Biblical patriarch Abraham) and “Stick To Your Own Kind”.

A video was shot for the track “Stabbed by the Steeple,” and print ads were centered around large text proclaiming “Jesus was a Black Jew,” but the album did not receive much publicity beyond that. Blood of Abraham fell into anonymity; their status worsened in 1995 with the death of Eazy-E and the subsequent folding of the Ruthless and Relativity Records labels.

Mazik and Benyad then went on hiatus until 2000, which saw the unofficial release of the LP Eyedollartree on Mastergrip Records, which folded shortly thereafter. Eyedollartree featured guest appearances from maverick rappers Kool Keith and Divine Styler, as well as will.i.am. Basement Records oversaw the official release of Eyedollartree (with bonus DVD) in late 2005.

Peace to HQ Hip-Hop for the link.

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Mark 563’s Hip Hop Portrait Sketches: West Coast

Sunday, March 14th, 2010

Mark 563 is a DJ, a graphic designer, he is also into amateur photography, but he also dabble into illustrations.

He is also a proud owner of one of the greatest vinyl collection i have ever seen.
Stay tunned after this one, cause soon after we will show you some more of his great work.
Enjoy and pleas leave the feedback, thanks.

** Click on the image to see it in a bigger resolution.





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The Villain In Black

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010

What other MC can rap about;

religion;

Fallin’ on your Jesus, comin’ for the pork chop
Wake ya out your sleep, shit is deep, about to wreck shop
Bombs goin’ down a mile deep, pushin’ up a mile high
Nigga ain’t allowed to cry while they disbelieve his God

the darkest streets;

Then every nigga had to get a turn
To make sure that this mothafucka learn
Niggaz kickin’ him – hittin’ him with bricks
Check it, and my homey lit his pitbull bite off his dick
And to top it off before my brother left the scene
He emptied off his clip with the whole 15

police brutality;

Now it’s time for the camouflage
And all the niggaz I can fit in back of the Dodge
Bound to go to war but this ain’t the Middle East
We’re killin’ motherfuckers for revenge, fuck peace
So if ya see us, this is what ya do
Grab your shit and come along, we’re killin’ cops in blue

and pussy;

Go back to the crib, we do that soopafly scene
Fuck your ass in the tub, rub my dick with vaseline
Make my shit stretch all down your throat
Quit tryna talk with that shit in your mouth just write a note
Or use sign language if you need some air

Only one does it with enough credibility for us to forgive his ex-group’s ugliest FAILS.

This two volume compilation is just to give MC Ren the proper respect he has gained. Here’s the rundown of the tracks I picked and why:

VOLUME 1 : MC REN

DOWNLOAD HERE

-from NWA’s “Straight Outta Compton” (1988)

– Fuck the Police(MC Ren only version) – I put this together just because.
– If It Ain’t Ruff
– Something Like That
– Quiet on the Set

-from NWA’s “100 Miles and Runnin” (1990)

– 100 Miles and Runnin’

– from NWA’s “Efil4Zaggin” (1991)

– Niggaz 4 Life

– The Dayz Of Wayback – so many tracks to pick from on this album, so I just picked two of my favorites, fuck it.

– from “Kizz MY Black Azz” (1992)

– Final Frontier – This promo track was burning radio’s before the album dropped. THIS is the way to debut!! Bobcat produced a perfect East/West coast mesh utilizing Parliament funk and BDP’s classic “Bridge is Over” piano.

– Right Up My Alley – Scariest rap track ever written. No one will imagine a Compton alley the same way after hearing this track.


– from “Shock of the Hour” (1993)

this album is divided in two. Ren started walking down his islam path while he working on the album. He could have not included his earlier songs, but he stated that it was important to show his growth as a person, so kept them as the first half of the album, while finishing the LP with more islam-compromised tracks

– Mayday on the Front Line – the first promo single for the album was the only track he would ever put out under the MCA label. This is probably why this track was included on the MCA soundtrack for that funny ass CB4 movie. Below is a funny video of Chris Rock confronting Eazy and MC Ren about the obvious mocking of NWA on his CB4 movie (also interesting is hearing Eazy claim that NWA was back but sucka-free without Dr.Dre).
– Shock of the Hour

– from “Villain in Black” (1996)

I would have happily put up the whole album. Just my opinion, but this is not only MC Ren’s best album, but also, one of my top ten west coast albums.
– B**ch Made Ni**a Killa
– Live from Compton ‘Saturday Night’
– Great Elephant

– from “Ruthless 4 Life” (1998)

-Voyage To Compton – This could have been a dope radio hit, and would have put Ren into a new limelight. But instead he rapped about “Fuck your ass in the tub, rub my dick with vaseline / Make my shit stretch all down your throat”. NWA hadn’t died in MC Ren.
– Must Be High – I had to put this track on, due to his impressive flow, and the beat is equally fresh.
– Who Got That Street Shit
-Pimpin’ Is Free – More obsession with BDP? He recreates “The P Is Free” chorus for this track.

– from “Renincarnated (Advance)” (2003)
I got this album from the internets a while back and I haven’t ever found much info about this album at all. Bigg Rocc and John Doe both appear on almost every track of the album.

– America
– Deadly
– Radio

– from “Lost in the Game” (2004)

Another album that flew waaaay under the radar. This EP was done to accompany a DVD Documentary with the name.
– Lost in the Game

– from “Renincarnated” (2009)

Again, another album that I should have just uploaded the whole album.
– Villainist Tales
– Black Star Line

VOLUME 2 – MC REN GUEST SPOTS :

DOWNLOAD HERE

– 2 Hard Muthas – Eazy E w/MC Ren
– Tha Muthaphuckkin Real – Eeazy E w/MC Ren

– Wanna Ride – W.C. w/ MC Ren, Ice Cube
– Legend of Jimmy Bones – Snoop w/RBX, MC Ren
– Hard Truth Soldiers -Public Enemy w/Dead Prez, Paris, Concious Daughters & MC Ren
– Raw Shit -Public Enemy w/Paris & MC Ren
– Roll On ‘Em – Crazy Toones w/W.C., Xzibit, MC Ren, Maylay
– Killaz in the Park – Above the Law w/MC Ren
– Process of Elimination – Above the Law w/MC Ren
– Ballad of a Menace – CPO w/MC Ren
– Gangsta Melody – CPO w/MC Ren
– The Shit -D.O.C. w/Ice Cube, Snoop, MC Ren, 6Two
– Set It Off – Snoop w/MC Ren, Nate, Lady of Rage, Ice Cube
– Chin Check – Ice Cube, MC Ren, Snoop
– Hello – Ice Cube, Dr.Dre, MC Ren
– Stallion – Yukmouth w/ MC Ren & Tech N9ne
– The Hardest – Kurupt w/ Xzibit, Nate Dogg, MC Ren
– Have Dat Money Rite – Chill MC w/MC Ren
– 2 G’s From Compton – King Tee w/MC Ren)
– Down Fa Mine – Kam w/MC Ren, Dresta
– Southland Killers – Cypress Hill w/MC Ren
– Bangin – Ms. Toi w/MC Ren
– Still Aint Free – MC Ren produced by Paris

— cenzi stiles

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The Bridge is NOT Over pt. 1

Monday, December 21st, 2009

This is not a collection of hip hop instrumentals. It isn’t a collection of beats with played instruments like De La Soul’s “I Be Blowin”, nor will you hear sample-rich beats with layered pieces meshing harmoniously like the Cunnylinguists perfectly executed Remember Me [Abstract Reality]. None of these work alone. They are part of the song, “musical bridges” that usually join two halves of songs.

I’ll start this off chronologically(and then proceed to completely lose respect for father time).

1. RUN DMC – RAGTIME

Run DMC were pretty much breaking ground with each song they made on their first three albums, sometimes to amazing success. On the other hand they tried a few experiments that didn’t even dent hiphop’s history. Mixing hiphop with a Big Band sound was one of those. After hearing “Ragtime” though, I personally would not mind hearing more of these experiments 😉

2. DIGITAL UNDERGROUND – NUTTIN NIS FUNKY

Although “Same Song” would fit MUCH better in this compilation of instruments wildin’ out over hiphop tracks, I fuckin’ hate the organ sound they used on that track. Instead, “Nuttin Nis Funky” provides a great slow galloping beat for a very hiphop-ish instrument to freestyle with tranquility: The turntable. DJ Fuze is by far my favorite DJ, so I place this track on a pedestal with a plaque under it that says “DJ’s: You Will NEVER Make Nuttin Nis Funky”.

3. BRAND NUBIAN – CLAIMIN’ I’M A CRIMINAL

One thing I would never have expected was Brand Nubian + acoustic guitar solos…

4. DJ QUIK – ONLY FOR THE MONEY

Dj Quik showed you how classy and musical he could be on his second album “Way II Fonky”. In between his gangbangs, his late nite pimpin’ and his soulglo-spraying, he managed to find time to really add to his tracks with instruments.

5. MC EIHT – STREIHT UP MENACE

And now for his one time biggest enemy, MC Eiht. Yup no G, just like Quik said “you aint got no G in you”. When I heard “Streiht Up Menace”, I figured that this would be the sound of his first solo album. I was wrong.

6. TOO SHORT – ONLY THE STRONGEST SURVIVE

Also on the Menace II Society album, we have a Too Short track, produced by the Dangerous Crew who have more than earned their bragging rights with their talented musicians to add mad depth to their tracks. Did that just read bork bork? Sorry let’s let the music speak for itself!

7. D-NICE – STRAIGHT FROM THE BRONX

With his sophomore album “To The Rescue”, he pulled a Kool G Rap on us with this track. They are the same in the respect that they both utilize fake instruments played by keyboards, in this both cases being a cheesy casio-sounding saxophone.

8. KOOL G RAP – STREETS OF NY

And now for the original 5-cent sound of that jazz musician trying to impress you for some change. With those minor piano chords, I’m impressed, here’s 10 dollars, buy yerself a flask of moonshine.

9. EAZY-E – EAZY STREET

All Eazy E fans know that he’s probably funnier than he is a cold hearted killer and this freestyle “skat” leaves NO doubt behind.

10. FREESTYLE FELLOWSHIP – INNERCITY BOUNDARIES

South Central, LA, home to another gang-riddled area, gave birth to another hiphop act influenced by jazz-skatting: Freestyle Fellowship. This Daddy-O produced track (crazy huh?) lifted the whole album by 100 cool points when he made the four MC’s flow over this all-instrument played track.

11. GOLD MONEY – NOTHING

I was just mentioning this album in the Pee Wee post I did. It’s the longest in this list at 3:41, and it’s also the most unique. I say this because it’s obviously jazz, but its got this funky backbone that makes your head bop hard. The drums are tremendously Digital Underground, and make you realize that, yes, they had their clappin-snappin sound 15 years before it got overused ad-nauseam in so many 2000ish hit songs.

I have more to come, but if anyone can help me identify more of these, I would love to actually blend these together in the future.

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