Posts Tagged ‘dr dre’

Take It Personal – West Coast Classics III

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

Episode 16 is the 3rd installment of our West Coast Classic series. We thought a trilogy would work, but there is just so much to cover that we’ll be blessing you with WCC IV in a few weeks. On this show we have tributes to N.W.A., 2Pac and Golden State Warriors (Ras Kass, Saafir & Xzibit). We also have classics from Compton’s Most Wanted, Da Lench Mob, DJ Quik, Spice 1, J5, Mac Mall, Kam, E-A-Ski, People Under The Stairs, Threat, Above The Law, Kendrick Lamar, Tash, Brotha Lynch Hung and Warren G to name a few. We plan to drop part IV real soon, so make sure you catch up to all 3 installments first. We hope this goes down as one of the most complete and entertaining tributes ever assembled of West Coast hip-hop.

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Take It Personal – West Coast Classics II

Monday, September 25th, 2017

Episode 15 is the 2nd installment of our West Coast Classics. This XL edition features tributes to Ice Cube, The Pharcyde, Cypress Hill, Freestyle Fellowship, House of Pain, Dilated Peoples and the entire Bay Area. We got joints from Jayo Felony, Spice 1, Mac Dre, Too $hort, RBL Posse, Luniz, Andre Nickatina, 2Pac, Tha Dogg Pound, Defari, Planet Asia, DJ Quik, E-40, Dr. Dre & Ras Kass to name a few. This episode clocks in at 4 1/2 hours, so make sure you listen in its entirety, because before you know it, WCC III drops this October!

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Take It Personal – West Coast Classics

Thursday, August 31st, 2017

Episode 14 is the first installment of our West Coast Classics. Dust off those Chucks, throw on your khakis and strap-in for this for this west side roller-coaster ride. We got tunes from N.W.A., Ice T, Too $hort, King Tee, DJ Quik, Digital Underground, Above The Law, 2Pac, Cypress Hill, W.C., Murs, Kurupt, People Under The Stairs, MC Eiht, Nate Dogg, The Game, Ras Kass, The B.U.M.S., plus special tributes to Snoop Dogg & Dr. Dre, Hieroglyphics and The Likwit Crew. Keep it locked, cuz the TIP crew is just getting started on this WCC series and even though there is a lot to cover, we tackle this muthf*cker like Lyle Azado.

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Best Producer on The M.I.C.?

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2017

When Diamond D said he was the best producer on the mic, we kinda agreed with him. Sometimes that self-proclamation just sells itself. When you hear “King of Pop” we all think of just one person. Over the years, many producers have taken a stab at rhyming. DJ Premier started as a rapper before he met Guru. The Alchemist and his buddy Scott Caan were The Whooliganz before ALC became a household name. Today, you have many multi-talented artists who do both very well. Black Milk is a perfect example. El-P another one. Roc Marciano and MF Doom handle most of their production too. This isn’t anything new in hip-hop, the God Rakim did many of his own beats. Legends like Large Professor, Erick Sermon, RZA, Lord Finesse or Havoc have always been equally talented on both ends.

But this poll is about picking just one. Who is the best producer on the mic? Now before you vote, understand, this list could have been as long as Schindler’s if I included everyone. The reality is, this comes down to maybe just a few guys when you truly think about it. And I’m willing to bet whoever you think should be added, isn’t better than the few guys I’m thinking about. It’s not that I don’t recognize many of the newer cats putting in work, but for this poll I went with guys who have been holding it down for decades, not just a few summers. These are guys with healthy track records, impressive catalogs and classics tracks under the belt. These aren’t artists who got a little too drunk one night and spit 16 bars. These are producers/rappers who truly have mastered the art of both. They are the Bo Jacksons of hip-hop.

Remember, you aren’t picking your FAVORITE producer or your FAVORITE rapper in this poll. You’re picking the extremely talented producer who you feel is the BEST rapper in this poll. Essentially, the best producer on the mic!

There can only be one, so who’s it gonna be?

[poll id=”30″]

Philaflava Presents – The Firm: How It Should Have Been

Saturday, July 16th, 2016

Freshly compiled on our message board by Queens native Pradadon and retagged, bitrate upgraded by TheBigSleep, here is how The Firm album should have sounded. Enjoy your weekend. –Philaflava

Firm Fiasco
Phone Tap
4 In The Morning
Executive Decisions
Time
Escobar 97 (Dirty)
La Familia
Triple Threat feat. Noreaga
Desperado (Nas verse dirty no drops)
Firm Biz (World Famous Remx)(Dirty)
I’m Leaving feat. Noreaga
Throw Ya Guns feat. Half-A-Mil

 
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Poll: Greatest Debut To Sophmore Album

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

There are tons to include in this poll but here are the most common ones. Rather than waste votes on stuff that might be worth of mention but stand no chance of winning, choose one from the list provided. I can assure you that the right answer is included in this list and that’s indisputable. Choose wisely yo! –Philaflava

[poll id=”28″]


The Greatest Mix In All of Spotify (1992-95 Hip-Hop by Philaflava)

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

This is mammoth! 390+ tracks, 27+ hours of music featuring Masta Ace, Spice 1, Lord Finesse, World Renown, Brand Nubian, Tha Alkaholiks, Mic Geronimo, Mac Mall, all the way to Da King & I. This has to be the most complete 92-95 mix of hip-hop you’ll hear on Spotify. Check it out and enjoy your weekend!

    10 Most Unappreciated Westcoast Rappers of All-Time

    Friday, September 27th, 2013

    un·ap·pre·ci·at·ed

    adj.

    1. Not recognized, as to quality or worth: an unappreciated gesture of good will.
    2. Not having risen in price or value: an unappreciated investment.

    For many years the left coast got overlooked as a whole, then came the early 90s and shit just hasn’t been the same for gangstas. While the Death Row/Aftermath era stole a little mojo from the eastcoast, there were still many westcoast lyricists who never quite got their proper due. There also has been an abundance of artists who never even got a chance that shine like the amazing Bad N Fluenz click featuring Rappin’ Ron and Ant Diddly Dog, The B.U.M.S. or Project Blowed‘s The Nonce.

    My criteria for this list is simple. You’ve had a respectable career. That means less than just three studio album. It means you’re still active (to an extent), though Mac Dre would have been an exception. It also means you’ve had to carried some influence or have done some really impressive work, be it on your own albums or others. Also, you can’t have blemished your career much. This list is who I feel are the most unappreciated, not most underrated from a lyrical standpoint. Because that’s another list which features the likes of Kurupt, Boots Riley, Brotha Lynch Hung, Saafir, Planet Asia and probably Mac Mall. This list, like all of them, is subjective but I encourage you to explore it and even come up with your own list of the 10 most unappreciated westcoast rappers of all-time.

    10 Most Unappreciated Westcoast Rappers of All-Time

    1. King Tee

    Tee has always been the Bernard King of hip-hop. The man has been doing it since ’88 with that deep voice and that O.G. narrative style. None are cooler, more likeable and unfortunate than King Tee. Having had his fair share of adversity, Tee never quite gained the props he rightfully deserved. And who can forget that whole Aftermath disaster that pretty much froze his career in carbonite. Tee has had an impressive catalog starting with Act a Fool and ending with The Kingdom Come.  From being a benefactor to the Likwit Foundation that spawned the careers of Tash, J-Ro, Xzibit and Defari to name a few. To influencing not just one coast, but both coasts. Even Ice T has gone on record saying King Tee was Biggie’s favorite emcee too. There are many rappers who never got the recognition they deserved, but none more than the great Roger McBride.

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    Jus’ Jeepin’ – 1993 Compilation

    Saturday, September 3rd, 2011

    Thanks to Jazarino and Hqhiphop for posting this up. Looks like a janky compilation from some fly-by-night label in the 90s. Nonetheless, the track list knocks and I didn’t even know a few of these remixes existed. Still, no Jeep compilation is complete without Uncle LL. Just saying. –Philaflava

    01 Main Source – Live At The Barbeque (Original Cookout Mix)
    02 U.M.C.’s – Blue Cheese (U-N-I-Verse-All Mix)
    03 Heavy D. & The Boyz – You Can’t See What I Can See
    04 Organized Konfusion – Fudge Pudge (Bob T Mix)
    05 Fu-Schnickens – True Fuschnick (Shaheed’s Fix)
    06 Gang Starr – DWYCK
    07 A.D.L. – Daddy
    08 Little Shawn – I Made Love (4 Da Very 1st Time) (Big Bottom Remix)
    09 Father MC – Lisa Baby (Hip Hop Fat Mix)
    10 A Tribe Called Quest – Scenario
    11 Dr. Dre introducing Snoop Doggy Dogg – Deep Cover (Soundtrack Mix)
    12 Nasty Nas – Half Time (LP Version)
    13 Ice Cube – Horny Lil’ Devil
    14 Cypress Hill – How I Could Just Kill A Man (The Killer Mix)

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    The D.O.C.’s Top 5 Ghostwritten Songs

    Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

    Somebody desperately needs to do a Death Row documentary that isn’t contrived, corny and where QDIII has no involvement. The D.O.C. is a book waiting to happen. –Philaflava

    1. “Nuthin’ But A ‘G’ Thang,” Dr. Dre featuring Snoop
    “When ”G’ Thang’ was created, I was living in Agoura Hills, and Snoop and Warren G were living with me. In 1990 me and Snoop each took the beat to different parts of the house to write. Snoop went upstairs, I stayed downstairs, and we met back up in an hour. When he came back downstairs I said, ‘Let’s take this piece and put it here…This doesn’t really work there.’ It’s really just like a jigsaw [puzzle]. And then I said, ‘For the last line [of Dre’s verse], let’s put my name on there,’ because otherwise I wouldn’t get to be in the song. That’s why Dre says: Like my nigga D.O.C./ No one can do it better.”

    2. “We Want Eazy,” Eazy-E
    “That was the first day I ever went to the studio with Dre in Cali, in 1988. Dre pulled up the track and said, ‘Doc, you got something?’ Eazy, Ren and Yella were there — Cube wasn’t around a lot. [The song] took me 15 minutes to write. When you’re 19 and excited, that shit comes out of you like piss. Eazy started learning it — that took a day or two. He wasn’t the most talented motherfucker in the world; it generally took him 12 hours to get through a verse. But when he got it it was good, and pretty soon the song was every-fucking-where. That’s a testament to Dre, who taught me 95 percent of what I know.

    3. “The Next Episode,” Dr. Dre, featuring Snoop Dogg, Nate Dogg, and Kurupt
    “I’d cultivated that song for such a long time. The very last line of ”G’ Thang’ is ‘Just chill ’till the next episode,’ but this song didn’t happen for ten more years. We did it three or four times before it finally appeared on 2001. We were just waiting for the right story, and 2001 ended up being a huge record.”

    4. “Prelude/Still Talkin’,” Eazy-E
    “That’s my Rakim impression: ‘Easily I approach…’ That was me giving Eazy East coast impressions that other West coast guys weren’t up on…[At that point] everyone was saying I was the greatest. I got a big head. When I came in with a good rap, Cube would have to go home and re-write his raps. We would goof around. Once we pretended we were film critics from London. It was funny to see Cube with his gheri curl, doing a British accent.

    5. “Alwayz Into Somethin’,” NWA
    “This was when Cube had just left the group. I’d just lost my voice. Everyone’s wondering, ‘How’s NWA gonna continue, with Cube gone?’ As for me, all I had was alcohol and strip clubs. I was going though a tough time. I wrote that song for everyone, and it made me feel that even though I’d lost my voice I was still valuable

    Source: LA Weekly