Posts Tagged ‘3rd bass’

Brooklyn Tribute (In Memory of James)

Saturday, February 10th, 2018

Our close friend, James Murphy, and one of our biggest show supporters unexpectedly passed away on January 26. Just 3 days after his 44th birthday. James was great person who made it his purpose in life to bring joy to others. I first met him in gym class my freshman year while discussing Brand Nubian’s In God We Trust. It was hip-hop that brought us together. Hip-hop was his passion, as it is for many of us. I was fortunate to experience many great concerts with him: A Tribe Called Quest, The Roots, Run-DMC, Brand Nubian, Heltah Skeltah, all the Rock The Bell tours too, but the one I’ll never forget was Gang Starr. Guru was his absolute favorite. After the show he walked up to Guru, called him by his real name (Keith) and Guru was like, “you don’t know me like that cousin.” Of course, Guru was smiling, signed an auto and we all had our moment- a special moment we never forgot. They called James “MC Murf,” even though he was far from an emcee. He reminded a lot of us of MC Serch. James was born and raised in Brooklyn and proud of it. He was BK to the fullest. When he passed I didn’t know what to do with myself. I still don’t. Losing a close friend is never easy. We all grieve in different ways and mine was to throw myself into music. DJ 360 and myself decided the best way to celebrate James’ life was to do a Brooklyn tribute in his honor. These are tracks that I knew he loved, but also tracks we love and ones we feel capture the essence of BK. We fully intend to do an entire show dedicated to the boroughs of New York, but for now, this is a mini-mix in honor of our friend, James and the great Kings County. We will never be able to replace James, as he was truly one of a kind, but we know he is still listening to us from upstairs. Rest in power, my brother.

Download BK Tribute

Remember KMD?

Saturday, January 6th, 2018

A common misconception seems to be who makes up the Native Tongues collective. The core isn’t as big as you think. There are affiliates like L.O.N.S., The Beatnuts, Brand Nubian and influenced groups like Black Star or Da Bush Babees too. But the NT O.G.’s were responsible for countless classics. Many of which, I’m sure make up some of your favorites. For years, every time there was new group that sounded like they influenced by the Tongues, that group was immediately heralded as the next Tribe. It happened early on with The Roots, then Slum Village and then Little Brother. We desperately wanted a group to fill that void for us, but none could match up to ATCQ. Out of all the groups I mentioned, I have always felt KMD could have carried that torch. Even though they came out around the same time and shared a label with L.O.N.S. and Brand Nu, KMD felt very much like they were from the Native Tongues school. From the lyrical content to the production, it felt very familiar. Back then, everyone was loosely affiliated. You had Prince Paul working with both De La, Latifah and 3rd Bass. You had The Beatnuts working with Pete Nice, Chi Ali, Kurious and Common. Everybody was somehow related. KMD had a short lived career, but their two albums gave every indication that they could have carried on that Native Tongues tradition. There are a lot of similarities between Q-Tip and MF Doom too. Age, personalities, reclusiveness, creativity, production and dopness.

Check out our Complex collabo where we lace you with the 100 Best Native Tongues Songs.

3rd Bass Reunion Show

Friday, July 19th, 2013

There are so many emotions going on while watching this video. Shock, disgust and just utter disbelief come to mind. I may have thrown up a bit in my mouth too.

Age isn’t immune to any of us, but Serch is damn near 46 and trying to act like a 26 year old here. And what is up with Pete Nice using an umbrella instead of a cane? There was a point where Pete Nice was this dapper suave muthafucker. Damn he was the cool one. He was swagger before we even knew of the word. I haven’t feel this nauseous since attempting to watch TNA wrestling a few years to only find all the wrestlers I grew up watching trying to stay relevant well into their 50’s.

Not everyone can be the Stones. –Philaflava

Mark 563 – Illustrations of classic album covers

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

Mark 563 from http://runtheline.blogspot.com/ is back with this new dope edition of illustrations, cover edition.

Enjoy!

**click to enlarge**

–Markshot

Prince Paul “Two Unreleased Tracks”

Friday, September 23rd, 2011

Thanks to Boothe from the Philaflava forum for spotting these 2 tracks on Mixcloud.

“Green eggs and swine , this was a song that was recorded for the derelicts of dialect album . Unfortunately this mix never made the album but was one of my favorites . The song is a bit too long but this was 1990 hip hop style production ..Hopefully you will enjoy the Prince Paul unreleased series of goodies more to come ! Why let it rot .. share music ..”

 

“This is a track I had never finished with Buckshot for the ” Politics of the biz ” album . The one that was released has Tre and Fatlip with Black ice .. This was left in the files unfinished . I figured its better shared than left in the computer to rot . “

 

A nice clip from an interview that Prince Paul did with Roc Raida (RIP) can be found on his Mixcloud page too. Any chance of getting Hip Hop Gold Dust part 2?

enjoy,
–dirt_dog

Pete Nice (3rd Bass): Riches To Rags

Wednesday, December 9th, 2009

Sports Illustrated recently did a story on Pete Nice. It’s a pretty great read and I encourage you all to check it because it’s not your typical rapper tale. Below are some excerpts from the article. I felt like After reading you’ll feel guilty for downloading Dust To Dust. –Philaflava

Pete Nice struts around a Hollywood soundstage, brandishing a silver-knobbed cane and spitting acid rhymes. “Getting paid to peddle sneakers and soda pop,” he raps. “The thin ice you skate upon will break and set ya straight.” In his boxy suit and slicked-back hair, Nash, 24, has a vaguely thuggish demeanor at odds with his Ivy League bachelor’s degree in English. To his fans he is Prime Minister Pete Nice, of the interracial rap trio 3rd Bass. It is 1991, and the group is on The Arsenio Hall Show performing its biggest hit, the No. 1 rap single Pop Goes the Weasel. It’s an extended verbal beat down of white rapper Vanilla Ice, whom it reviles as a culture thief, and it has helped pay for Nash’s tinted-window Mercedes and his penthouse apartment in New York City. “Ya boosted the record, then ya looped it, ya looped it,” Nash raps, “but now you’re getting sued kinda stoopid.”

Eighteen years later Nash sits in a café in lower Manhattan. At 42 he wears cuffed khaki pants and a short-sleeved button-down cotton shirt. He lives in a rental home in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., with his wife and young son, and he has driven a sensible Honda SUV to this meeting. Since his moment of fame as a rapper for Def Jam Records, Nash has achieved a markedly different kind of renown — among hard-core baseball memorabilia collectors who wouldn’t know Def Jam from Def Leppard. Over the past two decades Nash has become known as the most prolific source of the rarest old-school material, especially from the 19th century.

But on this afternoon in late July the tough-guy rapper turned baseball historian is mired in a widening scandal over the holiest relics of America’s pastime. Nash recently lost a lawsuit against a leading memorabilia auctioneer in which he admitted to fraud, and, according to sources, the FBI is investigating whether he sold forged memorabilia. (Nash declined to comment on the investigation.)

Long before his unlikely rise to fame as a white rapper, Peter Nash was obsessed with the history of baseball. MC Serch, also of 3rd Bass, recalls the first time he visited the home of Nash’s parents on Long Island, in the late 1980s. “Here was this 20-year-old kid,” Serch says, “and he had all this stuff: three-fingered mitts and Ty Cobb baseball cards. It was his passion, more than I think emceeing was his passion.”

By 2006 Nash cut the figure of a prosperous entrepreneur who might still be flush with music-business royalties. He drove a Mercedes SUV and owned a lakeside house in Cooperstown. But in fact he had acute money problems. Both the wax museum and Dreams Park partnerships had dissolved in lawsuits. His 3rd Bass royalties came to only about $5,000 a year, and an attempted reunion of the group, which included a performance at Woodstock 1999, never gained traction. Still, Nash showed no interest in a 9-to-5 career. “He never lost the celebrity attitude,” says Fraser, who says he fell out with Nash after he refused to sell Nash the 1912 Red Sox trophy. “A regular job was beneath him.”

Although Nash received a settlement in the Dreams Park litigation, the money went to satisfy legal and other debts. The house in Cooperstown was repeatedly under threat of foreclosure, the repo man was after his car, and Nash took to calling up friends for help in paying his basic living expenses: rent, a tank of gas, diapers, the phone bill. He seemed to be constantly juggling complex triangular deals in which he borrowed money (sometimes upwards of $100,000) using his baseball memorabilia as collateral. Sometimes he used the cash to hold off creditors, sometimes to buy more memorabilia.

“The only thing Pete failed at was being able to live without an object,” says another collector and former friend of Nash’s. “That’s what always got him in trouble, because when he had money, he always needed the next thing — and who can survive that, if you don’t have a job?”

Nash, for his part, dismisses a suggestion that a 3rd Bass reunion might help solve some of his problems. “Serch has asked me to do certain things,” Nash says. “It’s not like there’s any huge money in doing it. There’s a lot of interest, but I mean, it’s nothing I have that much of an interest [in].”

Click here for the full article.

Kurious Jorge’s Top 10 Posse Cuts

Friday, November 14th, 2008
Kurious Jorge’s Top 10 Posse Cuts

1. The Symphony – Marley Marl feat. Masta Ace, Craig G., Big Daddy Kane & Kool G. Rap
2. Buddy – Native Tongues
3. Gas Face – 3rd Bass feat. K.M.D.
4. Live At The Barbeque – Main Source feat. Nasty Nas, Joe Fatal & Akinyele
5. Scenario (Remix) – ATCQ feat. L.O.N.S & Hood
6. Young Stars From No Where – Powerule feat. Kurious Jorge & Johnny Jay
7. Off The Books – The Beatnuts feat. Big Pun & Cuban Link
8. Got My Mind Made Up – Tupac feat. Method Man, Redman, Dogg Pound
9. Money In The Bank – Kool G. Rap feat. Large Pro, Ant Live & Freddie Foxx
10. 24 Hours To Live – Mase feat. The LOX, Black Rob & DMX

Shouts to DJ Next, Amalgam and Philaflava. Check for my new album “II” coming March 2009 on Amalgam Digital.

Check me out http://www.myspace.com/kjorge10

–Kurious Jorge

Pete Nice & Daddy Rich – 3 C’s

Thursday, October 23rd, 2008

Corny, cool and contrived–that’s the most accurate way of describing Dust To Dust in 2008. While the many who’ll have heard this for the first time today may not appreciate the album, it’s those (like myself) who invested in Dust To Dust back in ’93 that’ll rediscover the album’s greatness. You might think it’s impossible to be both corny and cool, but I assure you it’s not. Pete Nice was the closest thing white people had to Big Daddy Kane in the rap world. I don’t mean that lyrically, rather stylistically. Pete Nice was always the “cool” one out the crew while MC Serch was always that goofy self-hating poseur that could have made Kamron (Young Black Teenagers) look like Asher Roth.

Dust To Dust is a great album for the same reasons it can be considered corny. The rhymin’ is elementary at best and sometimes flat out predictable. The album dropped at a time when rhyming wasn’t always sophisticated. Complexity didn’t exactly sell and I don’t think any of us would ever mistake groups like 3rd Bass or The Beatnuts for wordsmiths, but it didn’t matter because they were beyond witty, had an infectious swagger and most importantly dope production.

A year after the breakup of 3rd Bass and the debut album of former member Serch, Pete Nice got the co-sign by Russell Simmons to go dolo. Some might even remember seeing Russell in the “Kick The Bobo” video that sported a Serch lookalike getting beat down with a bat. Dust To Dust came and went with the quickness. Many people had already dismissed 3rd Bass as a gimmick and while Serch receive some attention from his ill-collabo “Back To The Grill” featuring Red Hot Lover Tone, Chubb Rock and Nasty Nas, it was Pete Nice who delivered the better album. It’s true that as much as Serch had help, Pete Nice did as well, enlisting friends K.M.D, Sam Sever and The Beatnuts for production. Psycho Les and Kurious both have guest spots and Cage debuts (1993) for the first time on “Rick Bring ‘Em Back.”

If you enjoyed Kurious’ “A Constipated Monkey” then there is no reason you won’t enjoy this. They’re practically identical albums. This one is just the “white” version.

Personal favorites:
Rat Bastard
Kick The Bobo
The Lumberjack
The Rapsody
Outta My Way Baby

Download Dust To Dust here!
Cop Dust To Dust for $0.75 here!

–Philaflava

Kick The Bobo