12May/09Off

Say What, Say What? Dante Ross


Note: Say What, Say What? is a new feature here at T.R.O.Y., where we will take notable net-savvy hip-hoppers to task for their brazen statements and/or WTF moments. We don’t dis nobody to be somebody, we just like to spark debates to keep the readers chatting.

Philaflava: Alright, check this shit out, T.R.O.Y. readers. Dante Ross, A&R extraordinaire and one third of the production team Stimulated Dummies recently did an interview with the homey Robbie at Unkut, which by the way I suggest you check out if you haven’t already.

Thun: It’s a great three-part interview, as is par for the course at Unkut. Dante The Scrub (sweating profusely) is one of hip-hop’s greatest internet interview subjects. His anecdotes are hilarious and he’s not afraid to mix it up with former members of Hard 2 Obtain in the comments sections of interviews that mention his name only minutes after his Blackberry receives the Google alert notification. More importantly, judging by this picture he is either channeling Copywrite or finally staking his claim to being the undisputed father of Scott Storch’s distinctive brand of d-bag swagger.

Philaflava: One of his responses in this interview kinda threw me a bit because if I’m reading this right Dante actually thinks T.I.M.E. is bad record. Now, I don’t know about him, but most of the hip-hop world out there considers this to be the best L.O.N.S. album and many even label it a classic. How on earth could he possibly think this was bad? Say what, say what?

Thun: Let the record show that the man behind Everlast’s enduring reign on Billboard had the following to say about the album that had “Spontaneous” and “A Quarter To Cutthroat”:

So what happened there? I thought the brass as Elektra pulled Busta aside and said, ‘We’re gonna make you a solo artist.’

That never happened, that’s all bullshit. Let me tell you what happened, ‘cos I was there. When Leaders of the New School turned in their second album it was bad – from me to you, it wasn’t a good record. I tried to change the record, make it better. They went back in the studio, had to do it again … when we went to make the second Leaders of the New School record I had Q-Tip ready to help me make the whole record with them, like the way he did for Mobb Deep’s album. None of them dude’s were with it except Bus … I’m gonna be honest with you, making that record – when they turned it in the first time, and I knew it was wack and I sent back in … I knew the record was bad, that when they turned it in the second time I couldn’t make it no better – they would not let me.”

Philaflava: We’re not done yet folks. A while back Dante said something similar about another album, it was Del’s No Need For Alarm. I’ll put my personal opinion aside because I am one of those who actually consider this a classic, but surely there can’t be any Del fans out there who dislike this album. Dante you truly believe both these albums were weak? Say what, say what?

Thun: He also once claimed that he hated the drums on K.M.D.’s first record, but lo and behold the brothers Dumile weren’t trying to hear his input. He kinda sorta has a point, because the drums are hardly the strongest aspect of the record. But are we to blindly accept that any record untouched by Dante is somehow less of a classic than it could have been with more of his knob fiddling? No Need For Alarm, Mr. Hood, T.I.M.E. – these may be records with flaws, but are they garbage? Really? According to what rubric? Is the technician’s nitpicking really relevant to the fan’s taste? Is hip hop reducible to studio algorithms?

Philaflava: I’m asking the readers of T.R.O.Y. to lend your thoughts and for the man himself, Dante Ross to respond. Let’s just hope he was misquoted.

ADDED: There’s a poll in the sidebar. Vote.

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